Faculty

Kirsten Martin, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology

Kirsten Martin, Ph.D.

For Dr. Kirsten Martin, the study of biological sciences means the observations within and between different levels of living systems. She first discovered her passion for environmental studies while exploring the woods and streams behind her childhood home. “I can spend countless hours just being an observer of a single small space” she says.

Sometime students can get so overwhelmed with the challenges of the present and all the potential opportunities that they see in the future, that the simple art of observation can be overlooked. “It has taken me awhile to understand that more often than not, you may not find an absolute answer in science”. Dr. Martin suggests that asking new questions, or examining the multiple layers of already asked questions can be a rewarding adventure in itself. Her advice to students is to “explore, investigate, and absorb, you never know where your career will take you”.

When she is not in the classroom, Dr. Martin can usually be found slogging through riparian areas, or paddling up rivers in search of her favorite research subjects, dragonflies. Currently, she is studying how nymphal dragonfly behavior is influenced by environmental change.

Recent Research/ Presentations/Publications

  • Ebony Jewelwing behavioral study June 2012
  • Scantic River Water Quality Study (ongoing)
  • Science team member for CT BioBlitz (2003, 2007, 2009)
  • Science team leader for NH BioBlitz (2004 – 2009)
  • Science team member for MA BioBlitz Stebbins Refuge Longmeadow, MA (2005)
  • Science team member for MA BioBlitz Agawam, MA (2007)
  • Wildlife Habitat Survey – East Windsor, CT (2000, 2006)
  • Gulf Stream Macroinvertebrate Assesment Project (2005-2009)
  • Scantic River Steamwalk Project (abiotic survey) (2005, 2011)
  • Connecticut River Odonate Survey-Turners Falls, MA (2006 – 2008)
  • Connecticut River Odonate Survey – Northern CT (2007, 2008)
  • Martin, K. 2000. Wildlife habitat survey of Volunteer Park. Report to the Town of East Windsor, CT.
  • Martin, K. 2006. Wildlife habitat survey of proposed town parcel. Report to the Town of East Windsor, CT.
  • Martin, K. 2006. Impact of bank stabilization technique, boat wake, water level rise, and predation on the mortality rate, and eclosure success of odonate nymphs in Gill, MA: Results of the 2006 field season. Unpublished report (MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, New England Environmental, Inc.)
  • Martin, K. 2006. Chipmunks as predators of emerging Odonata. Argia. 18:12.
  • Martin, K. 2007. Impact of bank stabilization technique, boat wake, water level rise, and predation on the mortality rate, and eclosure success of odonate nymphs in Gill, MA: Results of the 2007 field season. Unpublished report (New England Environmental, Inc.)
  • Martin, K. 2007. Photo documentation of Stylurus spiniceps (Arrow Clubtail) nymphal eclosure. Argia. 19:22.
  • Martin, K. 2008. Impact of bank stabilization technique, boat wake, water level rise, and predation on the mortality rate, and eclosure success of odonate nymphs in Gill, MA: Results of the 2008 field season. Unpublished report (New England Environmental, Inc.)
  • Martin, K. 2011. From dioramas to dragonflies: Redefining the role of natural history in environmental science. Journal of Natural History Education and Experience 5: 8-13.
  • Martin, K. Traveling across the toe: Riverbank features and their impact on emergence distance of Gomphus vastus and Stylurus spinicepsBulletin of American Odonatology. (currently under review)
  • Martin, K. 2008. Here there be dragons: dragonflies of the Connecticut River. Scantic River Watershed
  • Association Annual Meeting
  • Martin, K. 2010. Scantic River water monitoring program. Scantic River Watershed Association Annual Meeting
  • Frost, K., Morrison, F., and Martin, K. 2011. Monitoring rare dragonfly species through exuviae collections, Connecticut River, MA. North American Benthological Society Annual Meeting
  • Martin, K. 2011. Barriers at the bank: influence of riverbanks on emergence distance. North American
  • Benthological Society Annual Meeting
  • Martin, K. 2011. State of the Scantic. Scantic River Watershed Association Annual Meeting

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Academic Degrees

Ph.D. Environmental Studies, Antioch University New England
M.S. Environmental Education, Southern Oregon University
B.S. Wildlife Management, University of New Hampshire

Contact Information

Email: [email protected]
Phone: 860.231.5385
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